Everything You Need To Know About Uploading Videos To Your Website

Uploading videos to your website may seem to be a simple thing to do. However, if you want to get the most out of uploading videos, there are tons of things you need to consider. In order to maximize the amount of traction that you can get out of the videos on your website, you need to know the most important elements of uploading video content and why you should understand them before anything else:

Fundamental Terms That You Need To Know

It would be very helpful for you to first understand the fundamental terms that you may encounter before hosting videos on your website. For example, when considering a video hosting website, some might have a certain limitation on resolution or frame rate. If you don’t fully understand what they’re talking about, you might be on your way to making a bad decision.

Here are some of the most common terms that you need to know:

  • Aspect Ratio: Aspect Ratio is a term used most commonly for photos, TVs, and videos. It refers to the proportional size of the image or screen in width, then length, in the form of a ratio. For example, a common aspect ratio is 16:9, where 16 units is for the width of the video or image and nine units is the length. The common wide screen monitors that you see (and are probably using right now) is 16:9, while the widely-used squareish resolution that you used maybe more than five years ago are commonly 4:3.
  • Resolution: It represents the quality of the video image and can be measured in pixels per inch (PPI) or more commonly, dots per inch (DPI). When it comes to displaying video, resolution is usually written in the form of width x height where width refers to the number of horizontal pixels displayed and height is the number of vertical pixels displayed on the screen such as 1920 x 1080. When written in short form, it looks like height p, or to use a common example, 1080p.
  • Frame Rate: This is the speed at which a sensor captures video in a second. A single frame looks like a photograph. When you string each frame together, you get a moving picture or in other words, a video.

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  • Frames Per Second (FPS): This term is used to describe the number of frames used per second of a video. Common FPS include 24, 25, 29.97, 30 and 50. When you have a video that’s 30 FPS or more, it’s considered High Definition (HD).
  • Bitrate: Bitrate is really important. This indicates the amount of data that is transferred per second when a video is being uploaded, usually measured in megabits per second (mbps) or kilobits per second (kbps). If you find a video host that uploads videos with a bitrate of less than 1000 kbps, it’s best to search for another host since the upload process is too slow for most people. It also affects those who use a video downloader, so it is best if the user experience is optimal in almost all aspects of your site.
  • Encoding: This describes the process of taking an original (source) video file and converting it from one extension to another for viewing on different devices and browsers. Since different browsers and mobile devices accept different kinds of video file formats, encoding your videos can help ensure your videos are viewable to all your visitors no matter how they choose to view your video. For example, converting a video file called videofile.mov to videofile.mp4 allows the video to be uploaded and played on a WordPress site.

How to Upload and Add Video Files

Uploading files seems to be pretty straightforward most of the time, but if you’re at an intermediate level of video uploading, you might need to know more factors about uploading. For example, not all video files can be uploaded without the hassle. Most hosting websites, such as WordPress, allow for the following video encoding types to be used:

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  • .MP4, .M4V (MPEG-4)
  • .MOV (QUICKTIME)
  • .WMV (WINDOWS MEDIA VIDEO)
  • .AVI
  • .MPG
  • .OGV (OGG)
  • .3GP (3GPP)
  • .3G2 (3GPP2)

This means that if you’re using other video file encoding types, it’s best if you look for a video converter so that you can have the best video files.

At this point, you now need to consider which file type is the best. Of course, the different encoding types are made for various reasons: each file type has its own pros and cons, and are used for different purposes.

For example, .AVI files are on the top side of the highest resolutions possible – and they have the most detail and pixels – but the file is too heavy that you would need a ton of data and bandwidth allocation. .AVI files could be best as a raw material when editing a video, but never a good one to upload because it would be too hard to view (since the file is too big, uploading, downloading the file or streaming it would take too much data allocation).

If you’re self-hosting your videos, a general rule of thumb is to use MP4.

According to studies and personal applications, here are the best settings that you can use:

Format: MP4

Video Codec: H264 (High profile)

Frame Rate: 24, 25 or 30 (Constant)

Frame Size / Resolution: 1280 x 720 (720p)

Fields: Progressive

Bitrate: 5000 – 10000 kbps

Audio

Audio Codec: AAC-LC

Bitrate: 320 kbit/s

Sample Rate: 44.100 OR 48,000 kHz (retain original sample rate)

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This is the best quality that you can get with the most efficient file size. It’s not too low in terms of file size, but it’s still quite as HD as it could get. Just keep in mind that a higher bitrate results in a larger file size. As such, if your goal is to keep things neat and tight, choose a bitrate closer to 5000 kilobits per second.

Self Hosted, or Hosted Videos?

Here lies a very important question. Should you host the videos yourself (meaning you upload them directly to your website) or should you use video hosting sites (like YouTube, Wistia, Vimeo)?

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In the most basic terms, self-hosted videos mean that they’re stored on your server with your blog hosting website, such as WordPress. Hosted option means your videos are stored elsewhere and linked or embedded to your site.

There are straightforward ways on how you can make your decision. For example, self-hosting should be the easiest and probably the most secure. However, they come at a huge price.

To host videos well, you should make sure your site and server are optimized for speed. Be sure that your server has an ample amount of RAM and a fairly generous processor speed. The amount you need depends on how many videos you plan on self-hosting. Another rule of thumb: a video that’s 1GB in size should comfortably fit into a hosting plan that has two and a half gigabytes of RAM, a minimum of a dual-core processor and 1500 MB of storage space.

You should also make sure you have enough bandwidth allotted to your hosting package. If you think your site could blow up with popularity, you should consider how much bandwidth your site is allowed to use up. The more visitors you’re expecting, the more bandwidth you’re going to need. If you’re planning to display many high-quality videos with tons of visits to your site, you might want to consider hosting your site somewhere else other than your own server.

Factors that set successful cloud partners apart from their peers

Businesses around the world are flocking en masse to the world of managed cloud hosting in the hope that they can implement more effective IT systems. Cloud solutions are inherently cheaper for operations and infrastructure than on-premise data centers that require constant updating and maintenance, and enterprises have recognized this. 

In fact, an Infoholic Research report found that the global cloud infrastructure market is expanding rapidly. The study offered an estimate for the size of the market in 2015 in the ballpark of $109 billion. Though this figure is substantial, it pales in comparison to the projected market in five years’ time. Infoholic Research estimated that the industry will continue to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 16.2 percent until 2020, at which time the global market will be worth roughly $207 billion. 

The booming industry is gaining new subscribers each and every day, but many overlook the importance of choosing the right partner that can offer the most comprehensive services. The effectiveness of a managed cloud hosting provider can vary, and potential users need to consider more than just the cost of a given solution in order to determine which option is best for them. 

Cloud partners should help to streamline implementation

Industry expert Marc Malizia wrote in an article for CloudTweaks that a poor migration process is often the downfall of many unsuccessful cloud adoption strategies. After all, moving data, apps and infrastructure from an in-house setting to a virtual server is complicated and can be tedious. He cautioned that a complex plan should be formed well in advance of the actual transition. But for IT departments with limited resources and knowledge on the subject, this can be a daunting task if they are offered little assistance from their cloud partners. 

Malizia lamented that this can often be attributed to a lack of experience among cloud vendors in dealing with the actual migration process. He stressed that it is imperative to identify a provider that not only offers migration services, but has an extensive background in dealing with such transitions in order to assure that the process goes smoothly. 

In addition, the author pointed out that in most cases, cloud users still maintain some data and servers on-premises due to compliance and regulatory issues within their industries, or just a preference to keep particularly sensitive data within the building. Either way, this data needs to be managed somehow, and Malizia said that it is important that cloud providers offer remote management services that can oversee even the information that is not being stored virtually. 

DRaaS is no longer a luxury – it’s a requirement

Disaster recovery was once a simple – but expensive – concept. Businesses would purchase a second data center in a remote location, where they would back up and store their data in the event that their on-site servers were hacked or damaged. Since operating and maintaining a single data center is very costly, it stands to reason that this practice was only available to large enterprises. 

However, the cloud has completely flipped this industry on its head, Malizia said. DRaaS is a burgeoning sector within cloud computing that offers safeguarding of important data and functions without requiring extensive investment. The author noted that replication software can reproduce the majority of lost files, and the virtualized nature of these solutions ensures that businesses of all sizes can afford them. 

Malizia argued that DRaaS is not only accessible to all these days – it’s necessary. He asserted that cloud partners should provide these solutions as a part of their hosting services, and that the subscribers should not be faced with choosing and implementing the software themselves. The provider has access to your data, so that third party should also be tasked with backing it up and restoring it, should a situation arise in which those functions are necessary. 

Cloud migration is not simple, so it is important to identify a partner that can handle the bulk of the intricacies. To find out more about transitioning to cloud hosting, contact Datapipe, which provides top quality managed services for a variety of businesses and specializes in infrastructure solutions. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Businesses around the world are flocking en masse to the world of managed cloud hosting in the hope that they can implement more effective IT systems. Cloud solutions are inherently cheaper for operations and infrastructure than on-premise data centers that require constant updating and maintenance, and enterprises have recognized this. In fact, an Infoholic Research report found that the global cloud infrastructure market is expanding rapidly. The study offered an estimate for the size of the market in 2015 in the ballpark of $109 billion. Though this figure is substantial, it pales in comparison to the projected market in five years' time. Infoholic Research estimated that the industry will continue to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 16.2 percent until 2020, at which time the global market will be worth roughly $207 billion. The booming industry is gaining new subscribers each and every day, but many overlook the importance of choosing the right partner that can offer the most comprehensive services. The effectiveness of a managed cloud hosting provider can vary, and potential users need to consider more than just the cost of a given solution in order to determine which option is best for them.

Cloud partners should help to streamline implementation

Industry expert Marc Malizia wrote in an article for CloudTweaks that a poor migration process is often the downfall of many unsuccessful cloud adoption strategies. After all, moving data, apps and infrastructure from an in-house setting to a virtual server is complicated and can be tedious. He cautioned that a complex plan should be formed well in advance of the actual transition. But for IT departments with limited resources and knowledge on the subject, this can be a daunting task if they are offered little assistance from their cloud partners. Malizia lamented that this can often be attributed to a lack of experience among cloud vendors in dealing with the actual migration process. He stressed that it is imperative to identify a provider that not only offers migration services, but has an extensive background in dealing with such transitions in order to assure that the process goes smoothly. In addition, the author pointed out that in most cases, cloud users still maintain some data and servers on-premises due to compliance and regulatory issues within their industries, or just a preference to keep particularly sensitive data within the building. Either way, this data needs to be managed somehow, and Malizia said that it is important that cloud providers offer remote management services that can oversee even the information that is not being stored virtually.

DRaaS is no longer a luxury – it's a requirement

Disaster recovery was once a simple – but expensive – concept. Businesses would purchase a second data center in a remote location, where they would back up and store their data in the event that their on-site servers were hacked or damaged. Since operating and maintaining a single data center is very costly, it stands to reason that this practice was only available to large enterprises. However, the cloud has completely flipped this industry on its head, Malizia said. DRaaS is a burgeoning sector within cloud computing that offers safeguarding of important data and functions without requiring extensive investment. The author noted that replication software can reproduce the majority of lost files, and the virtualized nature of these solutions ensures that businesses of all sizes can afford them. Malizia argued that DRaaS is not only accessible to all these days – it's necessary. He asserted that cloud partners should provide these solutions as a part of their hosting services, and that the subscribers should not be faced with choosing and implementing the software themselves. The provider has access to your data, so that third party should also be tasked with backing it up and restoring it, should a situation arise in which those functions are necessary. Cloud migration is not simple, so it is important to identify a partner that can handle the bulk of the intricacies. To find out more about transitioning to cloud hosting, contact Datapipe, which provides top quality managed services for a variety of businesses and specializes in infrastructure solutions.

Hosted multi-cloud solutions can reduce IT expenses

Cloud hosting has been around for years now, but recently, a new trend has emerged within the sector – the use of multi-cloud solutions. Put simply, this concept refers to the use of multiple service providers to fulfill requirements. 

Businesses are enamored with cloud hosting due to the expanded efficiency it can offer. When coupled with the use of services from multiple providers, hosting can entirely transform an IT department and streamline its core functions. Users can lower their spending on IT infrastructure and also improve the accessibility of their data and apps for employees and clients alike. 

However, many businesses have clung onto their outdated on-premise data servers as the sole platform supporting their IT services. Before jumping ahead to the implementation of multiple cloud services, it is important that such organizations learn the basics of cloud hosting. 

Cloud hosting is flexible, convenient and reduces IT expenses

The premise behind cloud hosting is relatively simple. ITProPortal contributor Barclay Ballard explained that instead of using a single server to support an app or website, users will have multiple servers that host this data. If a server has an malfunction on a traditional single-server platform, the user will not be able to access the information kept on it. But Ballard pointed out that when hosting data in the cloud, data is stored throughout multiple servers, meaning that if one breaks down, the others in the network will pick up the slack. Mitigating downtime can be extremely important for businesses, which can see profits negatively affected when they encounter such scenarios.

In addition, the author said that at times when a website is experiencing high traffic volume, the cloud can adapt to deal with bandwidth issues due to its flexible nature. 

Single servers rarely run at full capacity, since most IT departments will expand their storage in accordance with demand to ensure that the system does not max out. However, this means that businesses are spending on space they have no plans to actually use. With cloud hosting, Ballard asserted, companies are only charged for exactly what they use, making such platforms more cost-effective. 

Multi-cloud services offer even more efficiency to subscribers

Though cloud hosting has proven to be efficient for most of its users, many have elected to go one step further to maximize the impact of their spending – subscribing to services from multiple vendors. This approach, known as multi-cloud, can certainly reduce costs for many organizations based on the prices that individual providers charge for each service. 

However, according to Information Age contributor Chloe Green, the multi-cloud implementation process can be challenging and, at times, confusing. While each cloud user will have their own specifications for infrastructure, Green noted that outsourcing management of cloud solutions can be an effective way to alleviate mishaps. She argued that subscribers need support and guidance while navigating tricky multi-cloud services. 

This is where users should turn to a veteran managed services provider. MSPs can assist subscribers in developing sound strategies for deploying multi-cloud solutions, and can effectively oversee and maintain the systems. Many IT teams are handcuffed by a lack of resources – human, monetary, technological or otherwise – and may have trouble dealing with the various facets of managing a comprehensive cloud-based infrastructure. Organizations that might find themselves in such a situation should contact Datapipe for MSP guidance. 

Datapipe has unmatched expertise in developing and managing strong, flexible and reliable multi-cloud hosting strategies that can improve a business’s IT functions and streamline daily operations. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Cloud hosting has been around for years now, but recently, a new trend has emerged within the sector – the use of multi-cloud solutions. Put simply, this concept refers to the use of multiple service providers to fulfill requirements. Businesses are enamored with cloud hosting due to the expanded efficiency it can offer. When coupled with the use of services from multiple providers, hosting can entirely transform an IT department and streamline its core functions. Users can lower their spending on IT infrastructure and also improve the accessibility of their data and apps for employees and clients alike. However, many businesses have clung onto their outdated on-premise data servers as the sole platform supporting their IT services. Before jumping ahead to the implementation of multiple cloud services, it is important that such organizations learn the basics of cloud hosting.

Cloud hosting is flexible, convenient and reduces IT expenses

The premise behind cloud hosting is relatively simple. ITProPortal contributor Barclay Ballard explained that instead of using a single server to support an app or website, users will have multiple servers that host this data. If a server has an malfunction on a traditional single-server platform, the user will not be able to access the information kept on it. But Ballard pointed out that when hosting data in the cloud, data is stored throughout multiple servers, meaning that if one breaks down, the others in the network will pick up the slack. Mitigating downtime can be extremely important for businesses, which can see profits negatively affected when they encounter such scenarios. In addition, the author said that at times when a website is experiencing high traffic volume, the cloud can adapt to deal with bandwidth issues due to its flexible nature. Single servers rarely run at full capacity, since most IT departments will expand their storage in accordance with demand to ensure that the system does not max out. However, this means that businesses are spending on space they have no plans to actually use. With cloud hosting, Ballard asserted, companies are only charged for exactly what they use, making such platforms more cost-effective.

Multi-cloud services offer even more efficiency to subscribers

Though cloud hosting has proven to be efficient for most of its users, many have elected to go one step further to maximize the impact of their spending – subscribing to services from multiple vendors. This approach, known as multi-cloud, can certainly reduce costs for many organizations based on the prices that individual providers charge for each service. However, according to Information Age contributor Chloe Green, the multi-cloud implementation process can be challenging and, at times, confusing. While each cloud user will have their own specifications for infrastructure, Green noted that outsourcing management of cloud solutions can be an effective way to alleviate mishaps. She argued that subscribers need support and guidance while navigating tricky multi-cloud services. This is where users should turn to a veteran managed services provider. MSPs can assist subscribers in developing sound strategies for deploying multi-cloud solutions, and can effectively oversee and maintain the systems. Many IT teams are handcuffed by a lack of resources – human, monetary, technological or otherwise – and may have trouble dealing with the various facets of managing a comprehensive cloud-based infrastructure. Organizations that might find themselves in such a situation should contact Datapipe for MSP guidance. Datapipe has unmatched expertise in developing and managing strong, flexible and reliable multi-cloud hosting strategies that can improve a business's IT functions and streamline daily operations.