Gartner Magic Quadrant use case: Enterprise application hosting

Gartner’s most recent Magic Quadrant for Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting, North America, contained a tremendous amount of information regarding the cloud services market. Key among the report’s offerings was an evaluation of the different service providers – their strengths, weaknesses and how they stack up against one another.

One of the most noteworthy aspects of the Gartner Magic Quadrant report was its focus on three specific use cases in this market: eCommerce hosting, Web-based business application hosting and enterprise application hosting. Gartner noted that it is very rare for a cloud services provider to deliver high-quality performance for all three of these use cases. Yet Datapipe may be one of the few to achieve this distinction. Gartner rated Datapipe as both a visionary and leader in its industry, one of only two vendors to receive this classification.

Here, we’ll take a look at how Gartner rated Datapipe’s offerings and how they meet the needs of the enterprise application hosting use case.

Enterprise needs

As Gartner explained, enterprise application hosting needs differ significantly from the eCommerce and Web-based business application hosting use cases. Most significantly, the sheer size increase inherent to enterprises creates unique cloud-related demands for such organizations. Enterprises require managed hosting for their robust infrastructures, which in turn are necessary to support large commercial software applications. These include offerings from Oracle, SAP and other enterprise vendors.

These enterprise-level workloads are typically very complex, as Gartner pointed out. Consequently, they require specialized, extensive knowledge on the part of the managed hosting services provider. Making matters somewhat easier is the fact that they tend to have a low rate of change.

Datapipe and flexibility

The specific hosting needs of enterprises makes Datapipe a particularly invaluable services provider, as the Gartner Magic Quadrant report revealed.

Gartner noted that Datapipe is one of the few cloud services providers that has managed to integrate its own hosting and cloud IaaS offerings with those of Amazon Web Services. This is crucial, as AWS represents one of the most popular cloud options available to major enterprises in every vertical, and yet most enterprises will also have a wide range of operations and workloads they would rather retain on traditional platforms. With most cloud service providers, enterprises would not be able to effectively, efficiently leverage both cloud and traditional platforms. However, Datapipe makes such a solution not only viable, but easily attainable.

Datapipe is also a powerful choice for enterprise hosting needs thanks to its expansiveness. Gartner pointed out that Datapipe operates data centers in three major metropolitan markets in North America, while also maintaining facilities in Europe and the Asia/Pacific region. Considering the global needs of many enterprises, high-performance and quick access to cloud services around the globe is often essential. Datapipe’s worldwide operations make this level of functionality a reality.

Furthermore, Datapipe offers support for Windows, Linux, Solaris and more operating systems. Additionally, customer services are available in English, Cantonese and Mandarin.

Cost considerations

Datapipe also received high marks from the Gartner report in terms of pricing. Gartner noted that Datapipe offers a consistent pricing scheme that prioritizes steady monthly cost predictability. Many other cloud services providers, by comparison, frequently charge their customers with add-on fees and other charges to boost their bottom lines.

In fairness, the Gartner report also noted that Datapipe’s prices can sometimes be higher than its competitors. However, as the Magic Quadrant report explained, these costs are due to Datapipe’s “focus on higher-touch levels of service.” For enterprises that are particularly concerned with customer support, limited down-time and high performance – which is to say, all enterprises – Datapipe’s commitment to service should far outweigh any additional expenses. Oracle in particular demands specialized knowledge to handle correctly in a hosted environment, and Datapipe has the experience and expertise needed to manage these solutions.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Gartner’s most recent Magic Quadrant for Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting, North America, contained a tremendous amount of information regarding the cloud services market. Key among the report’s offerings was an evaluation of the different service providers – their strengths, weaknesses and how they stack up against one another. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the Gartner Magic Quadrant report was its focus on three specific use cases in this market: eCommerce hosting, Web-based business application hosting and enterprise application hosting. Gartner noted that it is very rare for a cloud services provider to deliver high-quality performance for all three of these use cases. Yet Datapipe may be one of the few to achieve this distinction. Gartner rated Datapipe as both a visionary and leader in its industry, one of only two vendors to receive this classification. Here, we’ll take a look at how Gartner rated Datapipe’s offerings and how they meet the needs of the enterprise application hosting use case.

Enterprise needs

As Gartner explained, enterprise application hosting needs differ significantly from the eCommerce and Web-based business application hosting use cases. Most significantly, the sheer size increase inherent to enterprises creates unique cloud-related demands for such organizations. Enterprises require managed hosting for their robust infrastructures, which in turn are necessary to support large commercial software applications. These include offerings from Oracle, SAP and other enterprise vendors. These enterprise-level workloads are typically very complex, as Gartner pointed out. Consequently, they require specialized, extensive knowledge on the part of the managed hosting services provider. Making matters somewhat easier is the fact that they tend to have a low rate of change.

Datapipe and flexibility

The specific hosting needs of enterprises makes Datapipe a particularly invaluable services provider, as the Gartner Magic Quadrant report revealed. Gartner noted that Datapipe is one of the few cloud services providers that has managed to integrate its own hosting and cloud IaaS offerings with those of Amazon Web Services. This is crucial, as AWS represents one of the most popular cloud options available to major enterprises in every vertical, and yet most enterprises will also have a wide range of operations and workloads they would rather retain on traditional platforms. With most cloud service providers, enterprises would not be able to effectively, efficiently leverage both cloud and traditional platforms. However, Datapipe makes such a solution not only viable, but easily attainable. Datapipe is also a powerful choice for enterprise hosting needs thanks to its expansiveness. Gartner pointed out that Datapipe operates data centers in three major metropolitan markets in North America, while also maintaining facilities in Europe and the Asia/Pacific region. Considering the global needs of many enterprises, high-performance and quick access to cloud services around the globe is often essential. Datapipe’s worldwide operations make this level of functionality a reality. Furthermore, Datapipe offers support for Windows, Linux, Solaris and more operating systems. Additionally, customer services are available in English, Cantonese and Mandarin.

Cost considerations

Datapipe also received high marks from the Gartner report in terms of pricing. Gartner noted that Datapipe offers a consistent pricing scheme that prioritizes steady monthly cost predictability. Many other cloud services providers, by comparison, frequently charge their customers with add-on fees and other charges to boost their bottom lines. In fairness, the Gartner report also noted that Datapipe’s prices can sometimes be higher than its competitors. However, as the Magic Quadrant report explained, these costs are due to Datapipe’s “focus on higher-touch levels of service.” For enterprises that are particularly concerned with customer support, limited down-time and high performance – which is to say, all enterprises – Datapipe’s commitment to service should far outweigh any additional expenses. Oracle in particular demands specialized knowledge to handle correctly in a hosted environment, and Datapipe has the experience and expertise needed to manage these solutions.

Ravello Launches the Cloud Application Hypervisor

Hybrid private-public cloud models are the reality in most enterprises in the forseeable future. Developers and business units coninuously go “rogue” and use public cloud services, while IT struggles with maintaining compliance and control and managing…

Hybrid private-public cloud models are the reality in most enterprises in the forseeable future. Developers and business units coninuously go "rogue" and use public cloud services, while IT struggles with maintaining compliance and control and managing legacy apps in the traditional data center. I've spoken many times about this constant push and pull between flexibility and control in the cloud. And it is becoming apparent that we need a better way. Well, today, my friends at Ravello Systems announced that they have launched in public beta their Cloud Application Hypervisor and that they have received $26 million in funding from Sequoia, Norwest Venture Partners and Bessemer. I've had the pleasure of working with the Ravello team in preperation for this launch, and I believe they have a much needed solution -- built on a very unique technology -- for many of the biggest problems associated with cloud deployment. The best way to think about Ravello's technology is using the familiar hypervisor as an analogy. But while the traditional hypervisor holds a single virtual machine in it, Ravello's CAH holds a complex multi-VM app in it. This allows you to encapsulate a complete application (load balancers, app servers, web servers, databases, etc.) AND it's environment (networking, storage, etc.). The result is complete portability across clouds and between on-premise and public clouds. For example, you could take an existing VMWare-based application running on your data center and deploy it on AWS, Rackspace Cloud or HP Cloud as-is. So what is this good for? One of the first use cases Ravello Systems is targeting is the need to do development and testing in the cloud, while running the app in production in the on-premise enterprise data center. The cloud -- with its unlimited resources and ability to spin up machines quickly and then dispose of them -- is ideal for testing and development. But as mentioned earlier, enterprise IT departments still have many issues with running production apps in the cloud. These issues include compliance, security, cost and fear of vendor lock-in and dependence. With Ravello, developers can deploy the application "capsule" in a public cloud, run multiple instances of it for parallel testing, collaborate on development and generally enjoy the flexibility of the public cloud. When it's time to move the app into production, IT can simply deploy the encapsulated app in the data center. In the future, Ravello will address additional use cases such as more general cloud portability, cloudbursting and other scenarios. It's important to note that Ravello is delivered as a cloud service itself. You create an account, log in and can then create blueprints of applications (or use pre-existing ones) which can be cloned and shared. Screen Shot 2013-02-05 at 7.33.21 AM The leadership team at Ravello brings a lot of credibility to the table. Among them, Benny Schnaider, Rami Tamir and Navin Thadani, were the team that created the standard Linux hypervisor, KVM. They sold the company they created to commercialize it, Qumranet, in 2008 to Red Hat. Check it out